Interviews

Joe Rogan is His Own Worst Critic

The outspoken UFC commentator talks testosterone injections and the pros of pot use.

joe-rogan

The outspoken UFC color commentator and stand-up comedian talks testosterone injections, the pros of pot use, and why he’s his own worst critic.

SEE ALSO: Train Like a MMA Warrior

M&F: What has your experience been receiving testosterone injections?

Joe Rogan: At 48, the body doesn’t produce as much testosterone, and I feel better when I take it. I’m not advocating taking a hyperhuman level, but a responsible dose on a weekly basis adds a lot to overall health as long as it’s under the care of a doctor’s supervision. Some guys don’t want to admit they need it. It’s a manliness thing: “Oh, you get your testosterone from a bottle? I get mine from my balls, bro!” But doctors who work in the field of preventive medicine or who have researched hormone replacement and bioidentical hormones are for it because it enhances your health.

M&F: You’re open about your marijuana use. Why is the myth that pot makes people lazy inaccurate?

Marijuana isn’t why you’re lazy—you’re lazy because... there’s a lack of work ethic and understanding of how to get through life and not have regrets. I get my workouts in and all of my writing done, and I smoke pot all the time.

When used responsibly and intelligently marijuana can relieve pain, aid creativity, enhance feelings, and make sex feel better and food taste better. I don’t believe in waking and baking and staying fucked up the whole day. If you want to do it, fine, but that’s not how I use it. One thing I do love to do is get high and go to yoga class. 

M&F: How often do you do yoga?

I’m doing it at least twice a week, and I try to do yoga exercises at home before I work out with weights. As you get older, you become more aware of body maintenance and how nagging injuries can become chronic unless you take care of them. You don’t get buff or look yoked, but yoga is beneficial for overall health, movement, and flexibility.

M&F: Concerning your writing and comedy career, how critical are you of your work?

Very. The only way to improve is to be critical of what you’ve done. You might see only a little flub or hole, but looking at what you fucked up will allow you to avoid it the next time.

M&F: Does that get exhausting?

The key is not to beat yourself up too much. I take care of my mind... and all of my obligations, so I don’t have as many demons. People who don’t take care of their obligations... have regrets and feel like they’ve left things unfinished or left a lot on the table. 

M&F: What’s your connection to Onnit Academy?

I helped form Onnit with my good friend Aubrey Marcus. I’m a fan of nootropics—nutrients that enhance cognitive performance. One we came up with was Alpha Brain. 

Were you involved in creating the Onnit kettlebells? Originally we created normal-looking kettlebells, and then we threw around the idea of creating ones that looked like gorillas and great apes. We hired an artist... and had the kettlebells 3-D mapped and balanced. We wanted them to be beautiful, but if the balance was funky you wouldn’t get a good workout. Now there’s a werewolf, bigfoot [which weighs in at a whopping 90 pounds], zombies—lots of cool shit.

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