More Bad News About BPA

The chemical may effect your motivation to exercise.

More Bad News About BPA

If you haven't swapped your plastic water bottle for a bisphenol-A (BPA)-free one yet, here’s more evidence about why you should: Mice exposed to BPA just before, during, and right after pregnancy had offspring that were less active and more predisposed to burning carbs over fats, according to a recent study. “Since the same brain regions in humans and rodents govern physical activity motivations, the research suggests that early exposure to BPA could disrupt motivation to engage in exercise,” says Cheryl Rosenfeld, a researcher at the University of Missouri’s Bond Life Sciences Center.

BEYOND THE BOTTLE

Here’s where else you can find BPA and how to minimize your exposure.

Thermal-printed receipts

Most receipts from gas stations or restaurants are loaded with BPA, so handle with care or not at all.

Plastic containers

Pack meals in glass containers whenever possible. While BPA-free plastic containers are available, many contain phthalates, a chemical that may be a hormone disrupter, according to Joe Kurian, Ph.D., assistant research professor of obstetrics/gynecology and internal medicine at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine.

Tin cans

The lining of tin cans often contains BPA to help keep food fresh. Rinse off any vegetables that come in a can or buy foods fresh, frozen, or in glass jars whenever possible, says Kurian.

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