Training

One-Sided Training

Unilateral training is your one-way ticket to the next level.

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THE ONE-SIDED WORKOUT

We’re sure you’ve heard of the one-sided workout split — training the left side of your body on one day and the right side the next. Hey, if you’ve been training long enough, you’ll try anything to keep it interesting, right? Yet, unilateral training is not an ideal way to work out on a routine basis, mainly because research has shown that anabolic hormones, growth hormone and testosterone are not boosted as high in unilateral training as they are in bilateral training. So, we recommend trying this method as a change of pace to keep your muscles guessing and growing.

Because you are only training half of your muscle mass with a one-sided training split, you do not release as much GH and testosterone as you normally would when you train both sides of your body. That’s because one of the critical elements of hormone release during weight training is the amount of muscle mass being trained. The more muscle mass you work, the higher the hormone response. With one-sided training, you are only working half the muscle mass you normally would, so fewer hormones are released.

 ONE-SIDED SPLIT 

MONDAY: Upper body, right side

TUESDAY: Upper body, left side

WEDNESDAY: Rest

THURSDAY: Lower body, right side

FRIDAY: Lower body, left side

SATURDAY: Rest

SUNDAY: Rest

INJURY PREVENTION AND REHABILITATION

Training one side of your body will improve your balance — not your symmetry, but your sense of balance. For example, when you perform single-leg squats, you’re forced to maintain your balance in order to complete a rep. Improving your physical balance will help you avoid injuries.

When you have an injury, sometimes unilateral training is the only way you’ll be able to get anything done, since you’ll either need to work around a bodypart or you’ll need to find a way to move without pain in order to avoid stalling your progress

 CHEST WORKOUT 

Single-Arm Dumbbell Bench Presses: 4 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

Single-Arm Hammer Strength Incline Presses: 4 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

Reverse-Grip Bench Presses: 3 sets | 8-10 reps

Decline Bench Presses: 3 sets | 8-10 reps

Single-Arm Cable Crossovers: 3 sets | 10-15 reps

 LEG WORKOUT 

Single-Leg Extensions: 3 sets | 10-15 reps

Single-Leg Squats: 4 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

Single-Leg Presses: 4 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

Romanian Deadlifts: 3 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

Hack Squats: 4 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

Single-Leg Lying Curls: 3 sets | 10-15 reps

 BACK WORKOUT 

Single-Arm Lat Pulldowns: 4 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

Single-Arm Low Hammer Rows: 4 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

Barbell Bent-Over Rows: 4 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

T-Bar Rows: 4 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

One-Arm Seated Cable Rows: 3 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

 SHOULDER WORKOUT 

Single-Arm Standing Dumbbell Presses: 4 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

Seated Military Presses Behind the Neck: 4 sets | 10, 8, 6, 6 reps

Single-Arm Cable Lateral Raises: 3 sets | 8-12 reps

Single-Arm Dumbbell Front Raises: 3 sets | 8-12 reps

Single-Arm Bent-Over Raises: 3 sets | 8-12 reps

 

 

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