60 Days to Fit: Training Overview

This program uses a systematic approach for building muscle and gaining strength -- proven in the gym and backed by science.

In this comprehensive workout plan, each 12-day cycle consists of 8 workouts and 4 rest days. Within each cycle, you will have 1 light workout and 1 heavy workout for each body part, totaling 2 workouts per body part, per cycle.

So let’s break everything down:

Training Calendar

To maximize the number of workouts during the 60-day period, as well as maximize the total number of recovery days, this program is built around a 4-day training split, which includes:

Workout A: Shoulders/Traps
Workout B: Back/Biceps/Forearms
Workout C: Chest/Triceps
Workout D: Legs

For every two consecutive days of training you will have a rest day. This allows you to train at maximum intensity while getting adequate recovery periods. Remember that in the gym you break muscle down and it’s in the recovery phase that you rebuild – getting both stronger and bigger. This is why this program emphasizes proper rest periods – or should we say “growth periods.”

Note: On rest days, active rest is recommended. This can include anything from foam rolling, walking, hiking, yoga, biking, or any other low impact activity of your preference.

Light and Heavy

Since building muscle size and increasing strength go hand in hand, we’re going to implement a strategy that elite level athletes have been using forever – alternating between heavy days and light days. Heavy days emphasizing building strength and power, while the lighter days focus on size building, as well as promoting recovery so you don’t burn yourself out with too many hard workouts in one week.

By combining this strategy with our 4-day split, we end up with a 12 day cycle that includes one light workout and one heavy workout per body part. For example, you are getting two ‘A workouts’ in one cycle. One of those ‘A workouts’ is light and one is heavy.

On light days, you’ll focus on slower rep speeds that hone in on eccentric (or the negative) portion of the movement. Remember that the eccentric portion of the rep is just as important for strength and size building as the concentric, so we’re going to focus on getting about a 2-count on the negative. Now even though this is your lighter day, that doesn’t mean the workload is light. This day can actually feel more intense than the heavy day, since we are doing higher volume (meaning more exercises, more sets and more total reps) and with only one minute rest between sets. Additionally, we are going to increase the intensity by super-setting between exercises, which means no rest between those sets. This is going to make your muscles burn and push you to your limits. Trust me, there is definitely nothing easy about this workout – but it’s all worth it.

On heavy days you’re focusing on strength and power with heavier weights and lower reps, done in a fast explosive manner. Using faster rep speeds forces your body to engage fast-twitch muscle fibers which have the greatest potential for strength gains. Even though the weights are heavier on this day, you are getting 3-4 minutes rest between sets, so the perceived intensity doesn’t seem as high or hard as the light days. Remember, this day is all about building strength.

The Cycles

Now the last piece and one of the most important is progression, or progressive overload, which is the process of continually increasing the intensity of the workout as the muscle adapts to that intensity level. In other words, as the program goes on, it needs to get harder in order to keep forcing the muscle to adapt.

To do this, we’ve broken the program down into five cycles. Each cycle gets progressively harder. Traditional strength building models require you to record your one rep max at the beginning of the program, and then use a formula to calculate the appropriate rep for each exercise. This can be somewhat daunting in itself but where I see the real confusion occur is on each phase of the progression. The question becomes how much weight should I add each time. You then have to do this for each exercise and for each phase. I wanted to eliminate this confusion and eliminate all those extra variables.

I’ve simplified this all by creating progression by simply going ONE MORE REP, each cycle. On Cycle 1 your heavy days are 4 reps. As you progress to Cycle 2 you jump up to 5 reps. The same happens on your light days. On Cycle 1 you start out at 8 reps and then move to 9 on Cycle 2. By the time you’ve finished the 5 Cycles (which is the full 60 days) you’ve covered all the rep ranges – from 4 reps up to 8 on heavy days and from 8 reps up to 12 reps on the light days.

For example, maybe you started off at 185 pounds on bench press, for 4 reps, at Week 1 but by the time you get to the end of Cycle 5 you are doing 185 for 8 reps.

Altogether, this is your total plan of attack for building size and strength over the next 60 days. The only thing missing is detailed instruction on how to do each exercise. And I wasn’t going to let you down there. Included in this free program are more than 35 short, detailed videos explaining proper technique, common mistakes to avoid and tips for increasing the effectiveness of that movement. We made each video under 90 seconds so instead of wasting valuable time watching videos, you’re instead in the gym getting results. Each video is hyperlinked in the program so you can reference them easily.

We’ve also included a download of the full program as well as printable workout logs for you to track your progress.

Before you hit the weights, make sure to check out the nutrition overview and progress-boosting tips first.

Next:

60 Days to Fit: Training Overview

This program uses a systematic approach for building muscle and gaining strength -- proven in the gym and backed by science.

In this comprehensive workout plan, each 12-day cycle consists of 8 workouts and 4 rest days. Within each cycle, you will have 1 light workout and 1 heavy workout for each body part, totaling 2 workouts per body part, per cycle.

So let’s break everything down:

Training Calendar

To maximize the number of workouts during the 60-day period, as well as maximize the total number of recovery days, this program is built around a 4-day training split, which includes:

Workout A: Shoulders/Traps
Workout B: Back/Biceps/Forearms
Workout C: Chest/Triceps
Workout D: Legs

For every two consecutive days of training you will have a rest day. This allows you to train at maximum intensity while getting adequate recovery periods. Remember that in the gym you break muscle down and it’s in the recovery phase that you rebuild – getting both stronger and bigger. This is why this program emphasizes proper rest periods – or should we say “growth periods.”

Note: On rest days, active rest is recommended. This can include anything from foam rolling, walking, hiking, yoga, biking, or any other low impact activity of your preference.

Light and Heavy

Since building muscle size and increasing strength go hand in hand, we’re going to implement a strategy that elite level athletes have been using forever – alternating between heavy days and light days. Heavy days emphasizing building strength and power, while the lighter days focus on size building, as well as promoting recovery so you don’t burn yourself out with too many hard workouts in one week.

By combining this strategy with our 4-day split, we end up with a 12 day cycle that includes one light workout and one heavy workout per body part. For example, you are getting two ‘A workouts’ in one cycle. One of those ‘A workouts’ is light and one is heavy.

On light days, you’ll focus on slower rep speeds that hone in on eccentric (or the negative) portion of the movement. Remember that the eccentric portion of the rep is just as important for strength and size building as the concentric, so we’re going to focus on getting about a 2-count on the negative. Now even though this is your lighter day, that doesn’t mean the workload is light. This day can actually feel more intense than the heavy day, since we are doing higher volume (meaning more exercises, more sets and more total reps) and with only one minute rest between sets. Additionally, we are going to increase the intensity by super-setting between exercises, which means no rest between those sets. This is going to make your muscles burn and push you to your limits. Trust me, there is definitely nothing easy about this workout – but it’s all worth it.

On heavy days you’re focusing on strength and power with heavier weights and lower reps, done in a fast explosive manner. Using faster rep speeds forces your body to engage fast-twitch muscle fibers which have the greatest potential for strength gains. Even though the weights are heavier on this day, you are getting 3-4 minutes rest between sets, so the perceived intensity doesn’t seem as high or hard as the light days. Remember, this day is all about building strength.

The Cycles

Now the last piece and one of the most important is progression, or progressive overload, which is the process of continually increasing the intensity of the workout as the muscle adapts to that intensity level. In other words, as the program goes on, it needs to get harder in order to keep forcing the muscle to adapt.

To do this, we’ve broken the program down into five cycles. Each cycle gets progressively harder. Traditional strength building models require you to record your one rep max at the beginning of the program, and then use a formula to calculate the appropriate rep for each exercise. This can be somewhat daunting in itself but where I see the real confusion occur is on each phase of the progression. The question becomes how much weight should I add each time. You then have to do this for each exercise and for each phase. I wanted to eliminate this confusion and eliminate all those extra variables.

I’ve simplified this all by creating progression by simply going ONE MORE REP, each cycle. On Cycle 1 your heavy days are 4 reps. As you progress to Cycle 2 you jump up to 5 reps. The same happens on your light days. On Cycle 1 you start out at 8 reps and then move to 9 on Cycle 2. By the time you’ve finished the 5 Cycles (which is the full 60 days) you’ve covered all the rep ranges – from 4 reps up to 8 on heavy days and from 8 reps up to 12 reps on the light days.

For example, maybe you started off at 185 pounds on bench press, for 4 reps, at Week 1 but by the time you get to the end of Cycle 5 you are doing 185 for 8 reps.

Altogether, this is your total plan of attack for building size and strength over the next 60 days. The only thing missing is detailed instruction on how to do each exercise. And I wasn’t going to let you down there. Included in this free program are more than 35 short, detailed videos explaining proper technique, common mistakes to avoid and tips for increasing the effectiveness of that movement. We made each video under 90 seconds so instead of wasting valuable time watching videos, you’re instead in the gym getting results. Each video is hyperlinked in the program so you can reference them easily.

We’ve also included a download of the full program as well as printable workout logs for you to track your progress.

Before you hit the weights, make sure to check out the nutrition overview and progress-boosting tips first.

Next: