Master the basics to get stronger and build heaps of new, lean muscle with this comprehensive plan for beginners.

Program Overview


If you ask a lot of experienced lifters about how they've been able to sustain their results over the long-term, you'll get a lot of different -- and often conflicting -- responses. Add weight, reduce weight, change your macros, keep your macros consistent, and the list goes on. If it sounds confusing, that's because it is. We're here to clear the air and guide you down a proven path to results with simplicity, accuracy, and a challenge you'll look forward to every day.

What Really Works?

The short answer: everything.

When you're new to the iron, your body is quick to show you just how adaptable it can be. Sizes comes fast, strength gains come faster, almost regardless of what program you choose.

"Being a beginner at the gym is awesome," says Dan Trink, C.S.C.S., director of personal training operations at Peak Performance in New York City and author of the High-Intensity 300 workout manual. "Everything is new and exciting. You'll make great progress in a short amount of time. As long as you're not exceeding your experience or skill level, you will get the results you are looking for."

Put simply: Training, of nearly any kind, is going to help beginners add muscle and burn fat. With that knowledge in tow, where is the ideal place to begin? Some will swear allegiance to cardio-first routines, claiming that this helps you shed a few pounds and acclimates you to the rigors of training.

Those people are wrong. Others will tell you that all roads to physique glory begin at the squat rack. Judges? This is not incorrect, but the barbell squat—and other such lifts that are considered foundational—require technical proficiency that can escape most new lifters, unnecessarily increasing the risk of injury.

"Just because anything will work does not mean you should just be doing any program," Trink says. "In fact, choosing a solid program that focuses on perfecting foundational movement patterns will help you long after you are out of the beginner stage." Smarter training now, better results tomorrow. We enlisted Trink to deliver just that, giving you a program that has everything you need to learn the basics of training, nutrition, and supplementation so you can start building the body you want.

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Next: Training Tips >>

Master the basics to get stronger and build heaps of new, lean muscle with this comprehensive plan for beginners.

Program Overview


If you ask a lot of experienced lifters about how they've been able to sustain their results over the long-term, you'll get a lot of different -- and often conflicting -- responses. Add weight, reduce weight, change your macros, keep your macros consistent, and the list goes on. If it sounds confusing, that's because it is. We're here to clear the air and guide you down a proven path to results with simplicity, accuracy, and a challenge you'll look forward to every day.

What Really Works?

The short answer: everything.

When you're new to the iron, your body is quick to show you just how adaptable it can be. Sizes comes fast, strength gains come faster, almost regardless of what program you choose.

"Being a beginner at the gym is awesome," says Dan Trink, C.S.C.S., director of personal training operations at Peak Performance in New York City and author of the High-Intensity 300 workout manual. "Everything is new and exciting. You'll make great progress in a short amount of time. As long as you're not exceeding your experience or skill level, you will get the results you are looking for."

Put simply: Training, of nearly any kind, is going to help beginners add muscle and burn fat. With that knowledge in tow, where is the ideal place to begin? Some will swear allegiance to cardio-first routines, claiming that this helps you shed a few pounds and acclimates you to the rigors of training.

Those people are wrong. Others will tell you that all roads to physique glory begin at the squat rack. Judges? This is not incorrect, but the barbell squat—and other such lifts that are considered foundational—require technical proficiency that can escape most new lifters, unnecessarily increasing the risk of injury.

"Just because anything will work does not mean you should just be doing any program," Trink says. "In fact, choosing a solid program that focuses on perfecting foundational movement patterns will help you long after you are out of the beginner stage." Smarter training now, better results tomorrow. We enlisted Trink to deliver just that, giving you a program that has everything you need to learn the basics of training, nutrition, and supplementation so you can start building the body you want.

Shot at

Next: Training Tips >>