Training

More Size in Less Time

Add major size to your triceps with one working set.

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For my next workout, I’ll use another of my favorites, such as seated one-arm overhead dumbbell extensions or another form of pushdowns; or I may stay with the same exercise, if that’s all I can get. I don’t wait for equipment. I’m not going to sit there or stand behind someone and ask, “Are you done yet? How many sets do you have left?” I hate that.

For this type of training, I live by a logbook. I keep a detailed record of exactly what I did the previous workout, and I make sure that piece of paper doesn’t beat me. I might look at it and say, “Crap, I only got 12 reps on  the first sequence in my last workout,” so I’m going to keep that same weight until I get at least 15. Since, in my last workout, I beat my total target of 20 by doing 21 for all three rest-pause sequences, I will now increase the weight so that my reps drop below my first-sequence target of 15, then go at it anew.

Focus is fierce. Each rep must twist, pull and pump every fiber in every muscle. There’s no bouncing, no spotting, no help, no forced reps, no partials, none of that. If you have a training partner, he’s only there to scream at you to get that rep. He cannot touch the weight; every drop sequence is to positive failure. By that, I mean the weight won’t move.

This system is not for unappreciable gains. I’ve definitely put on some serious size, because it demands so much drive. If you don’t have the fortitude to do what I’m doing, then don’t even think about it; at the same time, don’t blame anybody for your failure. This isn’t a “routine.” You’re in there pushing as much and as hard as you possibly can, getting as much out of every second, every inch, as is inhumanly possible. Think of it as compressing an hour-long workout into 10 minutes. That’s all you’re allowed.

“There has to be at least one exercise each day that you want to beat, but it must be by a full rep; not a quarter rep, not a half rep, but all the way to a full extension. Any ‘almost done it’ doesn’t count. It’s four reps, zero tolerance. That’s why this training works; and if you don’t go by your logbook, you’ll look the same, year after year.”

 

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