Workout Tips

Lee Haney: Born to Be Wide

Train better–not harder–to reap the rewards.

Weider Workout Principle: Muscle Confusion

Lee Haney trained by the motto of “Stimulate, don’t annihilate,” and it served as a reasoned counterpoint to cries of “No pain, no gain!” As he collected a record eight Sandows from 1984 to 1991, the Georgian giant quietly did things his way. He followed the three-on, one-off system, popular in the ’80s, but steered clear of the typical push-and-pull division of upper body. Instead, he grouped chest with arms and back with shoulders, as shown here. Thus, Haney had a “width day” dedicated to the breadth he used to dominate bodybuilding for nearly a decade.

Tip Sheet

  • Haney often hit back and shoulders separately on the same day. When doing them in the same workout, cut down on sets to conserve energy.
  • You can alternate back and shoulder exercises. Just make sure rear delts are worked last.
  • Do more pulldowns and pull-ups for upper lats and more laterals and upright rows for medial delts.

Haney's Width Routine

Exercise Sets Reps
Front Pulldown 4 8-10
Barbell Row 4 8-10
Seated Cable Row 4 8-10
One-arm Dumbbell Row 4 8-10


Exercise Sets Reps
Standing Military press 4-5 6-10
Dumbbell Side Lateral 4 8-10
Bentover Rear Lateral 4 8-10
Upright Row 3 6-10
Behind-the-back Shrug 3 6-10

Career Highlights

  • 8-time Mr. O (1984-91)
  • 1982 IFBB World Championships heavyweight winner; NPC Nationals overall champ (age 22)