Nutrition

Millions of Eggs Recalled Amid Salmonella Outbreak: What You Need to Know

Most cases have been concentrated on the East Coast, but the Centers for Disease Control warned all Americans to be on the lookout for bacteria-tainted eggs.

Eggs
BRETT STEVENS

Eggs have long been a staple in many muscle-building diets. But you may want to be careful of where you’re getting your eggs—at least for the time being.

At least 35 people have gotten sick from a batch of salmonella-contaminated eggs, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control announced. But despite the U.S. Department of Agriculture's recall of 200 million eggs, people are continuing to get sick from salmonella.

The initial salmonella outbreak was reported in April, affecting 23 people before the USDA issued a recall on April 13. The eggs in question were traced back to Rose Acre Farms in Indiana. From there, they'd been shipped to grocery stores across America. Since the recall, an additional 12 people have gotten sick, bringing the total to 35. Of those affected, 11 were hospitalized. Most of the cases have been concentrated on the East Coast—New York and Virginia have been hardest hit—but Colorado has seen a related case as well.

What is salmonella?

Salmonella is a bacteria that causes severe diarrhea, stomach cramps, and fever—like a very bad case of food poisoning. People affected begin to feel symptoms between 12 and 72 hours after exposure to tainted food, usually in the form of poultry or meat. While salmonella typically isn't life-threatening, and usually clears up on its own, it can be very dangerous for young children, the elderly, and anyone with a weakened immune system.

What should you do?

The reported cases were in nine states—Colorado, Florida, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. The eggs were sold under multiple brand names, including Great Value, Publix, Sunshine Farms, and Sunups, and were also served at restaurants including Waffle House.

All consumers should check their eggs (here's how to identify eggs affected by the recall) before they buy, and throw out any eggs they think are potentially contaminated. If you begin to feel any of the symptoms of salmonella poisoning—fever, diarrhea, stomach cramps—after eating eggs, immediately contact a health-care professional.

Read the CDC’s full report on the incident as well as their recommendations.

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